Classifying camellias – the white edit

I am continuing my journey of trying to classify and indentifying the array of camellias on our property.

A quick back story: we did not plant out this garden, it was established when we bought it. I met the lady who planted all the trees. The garden was devastated in the 1983 bushfires. More on this in another post.

So, here goes – the white edit …

A collection of white or almost white camellias
Shiragiku, origins Japan c. japonica

A pure white camellia with, what I call, filigree petals.

Paolina Maggi, originated in Italy c. Japonica

These are in the green vase and are pure white with tender pink flecks on the edges of each petal.

Magnafolia (Hagoromo) – as the name suggests, originated in Italy but made its way to Japan

This is a particularly robust and sturdy tree, about 30ft in height. The flowers are small compared to the other camellias. Dark pink edges and last well in a vase.

Here is the tree in situ

Lastly, one of my favourites and an Australian cultivar – Brushfields yellow.

A very pale yellow – gorgeous blooms

Happy gardening and take time in the garden. Follow me on Instagram too – crabandfish_garden for more gardening adventures.

Take care and find solace in the garden.

Breakfast flowers

One of the simple pleasures is breakfast at our local coffee shop with good book in tow. This morning these beautiful spring flowers welcomed me at the table.

I am reading Kate Llewellyn’s A Fig at the Gate (Crows Nest, NSW: Allen and Unwin, 2014). Her reflections on gardening and life are wise and considered.

Now I ready for a day in the garden. How have you started your Saturday?

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crabandfish_garden for short reflections too. Happy weekend.

Peony church

Actually it’s a peony farm with an old weatherboard chapel on site – divine. I absolutely love this time of year and these herbaceous peonies are stunning!

However, tree peonies are quite different – still beautiful though.

See my previous posts entitled The Peony Farm and Peony time to see the rows and rows of pink flowering blooms.

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The last of the gold

The last of the autumn leaves. This large prunus tree shades our back deck in summer and certainly gives us a spectacular treat in spring with its pink blossoms and then again in autumn when it sheds its glorious, golden leaves.

I don’t mind raking up the multitude of fallen leaves. It’s been so dry this autumn that it was quite an easy task, despite my cat Albert’s interest in them too!

It’s always wonderful to see overseas visitors come to the mountain to see the dramatic display. It is said to be auspicious in many Asian cultures to be in and among the autumn hues. It is a revered and some even say, a spiritual experience.

My neighbour recently reprimanded me when she spotted some fake flowers in one of my vases, “we live surrounded by beauty and real colour, bring some fresh foliage into the house!” I took her advice.

I hope you can display some of your garden in your home this weekend and enjoy some time with family or friends. Happy gardening. 🙂

Peony time

This has to be one of the most exciting of gardening times – when peonies bloom. They are the grandest of all flowers – I think, at least, and very fortuitous in Oriental cultures.  I would like to brag that this vase of pink and white blooms are from my garden but sadly no. They are from Springhill Peony Farm about thirty minutes from here. Each November they offer pick your own peonies –  spectacular! Our garden has one peony plant and it has blossomed once since we have been here – an amazing yellow peony but never since! I must be doing something wrong. 

   

  I am going to enjoy this special time in Nature and maybe have some home grown luck next year.    

Happy garden time where ever you are 🙂