Classifying camellias – the white edit

I am continuing my journey of trying to classify and indentifying the array of camellias on our property.

A quick back story: we did not plant out this garden, it was established when we bought it. I met the lady who planted all the trees. The garden was devastated in the 1983 bushfires. More on this in another post.

So, here goes – the white edit …

A collection of white or almost white camellias
Shiragiku, origins Japan c. japonica

A pure white camellia with, what I call, filigree petals.

Paolina Maggi, originated in Italy c. Japonica

These are in the green vase and are pure white with tender pink flecks on the edges of each petal.

Magnafolia (Hagoromo) – as the name suggests, originated in Italy but made its way to Japan

This is a particularly robust and sturdy tree, about 30ft in height. The flowers are small compared to the other camellias. Dark pink edges and last well in a vase.

Here is the tree in situ

Lastly, one of my favourites and an Australian cultivar – Brushfields yellow.

A very pale yellow – gorgeous blooms

Happy gardening and take time in the garden. Follow me on Instagram too – crabandfish_garden for more gardening adventures.

Take care and find solace in the garden.

May days and smoky mountain

The month of May is at a close and so too most of the trees in our garden have shed their autumnal foliage.  In the house, the wood fire heater has been cranked up and we have braced ourselves for some wintry weather. Here at 700 metres altitude we sometimes get snow, certainly we experience ice and frost. However, the garden copes very well.  This year autumn has been very dry with some trees going into distress. Now, the rains have come, and it always amazes me to see the first pop of camellia buds.

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I am in the garden every day no matter the weather. Last weekend we set fire to some very large mounds of debris, accumulated throughout the summer. The Country Fire Association sets the fire season and we cannot light any outside fires, but once this is lifted, usually the end of April – this year it was the 3rd of May,  we can begin to burn off. Our neighbours gather around, and we celebrate the arrival of cooler weather and banish the thought of bushfires from our minds – albeit until next summer.

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We have a saying here on the Mount – “all summer we fear seeing smoke and all winter we create smoke” – smoky mountain indeed. Happy gardening everyone – no matter the season where you live.

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Surprise harvest

The tomatoes this year have been unusually late. As temperatures plummet and new garden beds needed, these came as a pleasant surprise.

I guess this marks the end of autumn. Make room for winter plantings.

Happy gardening, no matter the season.