Camellia chronicles – paused

September has come and gone and I realise my camellia identification has paused. This is mainly due to the vast amount of information and images available and the fact that it is quite confusing. Just when I think I have identified a particular flower I view another even closer to my own.

Therefore, I thought I’d wait until such time as I can visit a camellia show in person. In the meantime, here is a selection of our much loved and admired blooms.

By the way, most of these have been flowering since August.

I hope you have enjoyed seeing this array of camellias. We have lived here on the mountain coming up to seventeen years in November and I am constantly grateful to the lady who had such vision to plant camellias. They are scattered in all areas of the garden and once established dong need much attention – pick and enjoy.

Keep gardening and stay well. You can follow me on Instagram @crabandfish_garden, too.

Classifying camellias – the white edit

I am continuing my journey of trying to classify and indentifying the array of camellias on our property.

A quick back story: we did not plant out this garden, it was established when we bought it. I met the lady who planted all the trees. The garden was devastated in the 1983 bushfires. More on this in another post.

So, here goes – the white edit …

A collection of white or almost white camellias
Shiragiku, origins Japan c. japonica

A pure white camellia with, what I call, filigree petals.

Paolina Maggi, originated in Italy c. Japonica

These are in the green vase and are pure white with tender pink flecks on the edges of each petal.

Magnafolia (Hagoromo) – as the name suggests, originated in Italy but made its way to Japan

This is a particularly robust and sturdy tree, about 30ft in height. The flowers are small compared to the other camellias. Dark pink edges and last well in a vase.

Here is the tree in situ

Lastly, one of my favourites and an Australian cultivar – Brushfields yellow.

A very pale yellow – gorgeous blooms

Happy gardening and take time in the garden. Follow me on Instagram too – crabandfish_garden for more gardening adventures.

Take care and find solace in the garden.

Camellia challenge – the pink edit

I’ve been investigating the identity of some of the pink camellias blooming in our garden now. I collected some for the table.

Readers Digest Gardeners Encyclopaedia of Plants and Flowers

I began by looking at this popular encyclopaedia which was on my bookshelf. However, I had greater success with the website http://www.camelliasaustralia.com.au – so here goes…

A beautiful mid pink rose-like flowers – Ellie’s Girl.

Pale pink large double flowers- Mrs DW Descanso. These have been flowering since June!

Rosy salmon blooms – Harriet Beecher Sheather.

Of course, it’s a challenge identifying a bloom from a page or a website. Would love to attend a camellia conference – one day!

Enjoy your season. Next week: the white edit 😊💐🌺🌷

Recording Camellias

I grant you it may be a misleading title, however, I have been wanting to start this project for the last fifteen years!!!! Time flies…. But here we are in isolation, so there is no better time than to go around the garden and try to identify and/or record each species of flowering camellias. So, today I start with these which, as it happens, are basking in rare sunshine, here on the mountain.

Camellia sasanqua featuring large rose-form flowers. As yet, haven’t found a name for this gorgeous specimen which flowers in our cold, August winters.

Seven years

WordPress just informed me I have been blogging about my garden for seven years – that’s amazing! Thank you to all my followers and to those who comment and share their thoughts and ideas – it’s great to a part of your botanical community!

Mid-winter garden

It’s time I went back into the garden. Our rambling garden is never too far from my thoughts even when I am away. However, despite its low light and chill, winter is a special season here. It was during this time we found this garden – glistening in the late afternoon, beckoning me. That was twelve years ago, in July.

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During winter our mountain garden seems so still and silent. It sleeps, quietly now, nurturing its progeny. As the temperature drops and with the June winds abated, each garden bed is preparing to reveal its private secret.

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The mid-winter garden is always remarkable – it is a profusion of colours. Tall, pale pink and scarlet camellias arching their flowers to the sun. Short squat ones caressing the ground. Oversized faces turning to catch the light. The slow emergence of bulbs – tulips, narcissus, daffodils and the garlic. Nodding hellebores are now making themselves known, their burnt summer leaves gone, replaced now by new, vivid, green serrations.

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As the temperature drops, I can rely on three certainties in the garden: an abundance of colour, a stillness and peacefulness and, my favourite, winter rosella adorning the leaf-less trees. Mid-winter wonders, indeed.

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As the temperature drops, I can rely on three certainties in the garden: an abundance of colour, a stillness and peacefulness and, my favourite, winter rosellas adorning the leaf-less trees. Mid-winter wonders, indeed.